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Poster: grendelschoice Date: Oct 9, 2006 3:14pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: The ones that aged well, and those that didn't

Please to add your thoughts on others if you wih that I don't include on this list:

1)Like a fine wine that grows even better as it gets older:

STELLA BLUE: Sounds almost skeletal (pun intended) in its '73 infancy...yeah, jerry's voice is better then but over time the song was improved by Brent's far better back up singing, powerful organ during the "Shine!" chorus, and the extra phrase they waited before launching into "dust off those rusty strings..." There are even those who speak of some of the finest Stella's being played in 1994, but I remain a skeptic about anything after '91.
Nice vintage example: 4-19-82

ESTIMATED: I'm expecting some grief over this one. Nothing at all wrong with its 1977 birth year, but I'm actually a fan of some of Bobby's crazy Howard-Dean-Screams he added in the 80's...Jerry too enjoyed expanding the jam out beyond just his wah-wah when the song began...I even think his midi did some nice things with it in '90.
Nice Vintage example(s) 4-19-82 again; Hampton, spring '88.

LOSER: This song was always great, but you can't deny that over time it developed into the jaw-dropping monster that would sometimes actually kick the crap out of anything that followed, even in the 2nd set. The early versions just didn't have those building crescendo jams that Garcia grinded out before getting back to the second "Last Fair Deal" verse.
Nice vintage example(s): Ventura Cty, July '84, and the mack Daddy: Albany, 3-24-90.

2)Songs that aged, well, like cheese left under a hot radiator:

ROW JIMMY: One of my all time favorites, and sooooo much better back in the day, especially its debut year of '73.
used to be groovy, focused, almost jaunty, sung with gusto by Garcia, mellow but not sleepy. A gorgeous song. In later years was turned into a ponderous, slogging, croaky Garcia train wreck. Like watching Willy Mays try to play Center field for the Mets at the end of his career.
Vintage Jimmy: The DP from Salt Lake City, forget which # or date. Killer version. Brilliant; unsurpassed.

NOT FADE AWAY: Hear me out. Please. Was a jamming, bouncy, gritty winner (just listen to the all-time killer NFA>GDTRFB from Skull&roses) and even got hotter in THE year of 1977 (hardcore Rock and Roll)....later became a predictable show-ender, clap-along to nothing for 5 minutes excuse for Jerry to get back to his dressing room for another smoke before the encore.
Vintage NFA: DP from Winterland '77.

JACK A ROE (electric only). Slow down, dammit!
Vintage Jack: From the Phil Zone version from a show in Alabama, '77.

There are many others I can't think of right now, and some that were just great no matter when (EYES for example; maybe you like the Stronger than Dirst versions of '73-'74, but the Branford versions in 1990 are just as sweet in a different way).

Curious to hear theories on others or even to debate the ones mentioned here. Peace.

GC

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Poster: Arbuthnot Date: Oct 9, 2006 3:50pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The ones that aged well, and those that didn't

Cool. Thanks for the suggestions. Agreed about Row Jimmy, and also a personal fave (especially of late). Been giving numerous listens to the versions from 6/10/73 (RFK) & 5/8/77 (BARTON).

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Poster: as1307 Date: Oct 9, 2006 7:35pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The ones that aged well, and those that didn't

i think terrapin improved in the later years, especially when they improvised a bit after the song itself

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Poster: as1307 Date: Oct 9, 2006 3:46pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The ones that aged well, and those that didn't

great post. and i especially like the mention of bobby's "howard dean" screams in estimated!

will give this more thought, but what comes to mind as a tune that declined over time is other one, which was fiery and intense in 68-69, and was often sprawling and massive circa '72, and pretty dissapointing later on.

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Poster: grendelschoice Date: Oct 9, 2006 3:52pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The ones that aged well, and those that didn't

Interesting...

I thought about that (other) one but couldn;t decide how to classify it...I think some of the 1977 Other Ones, as opposed to the more psychedelia-flavored late 60's ones-- are among the best ever performed, and in '79 they ripped it up as well (Cape Cod shows 10-27-28, I think)....

then, I would agree, the 80's were unkind to The Other One, and perhaps its best years were behind it.

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Poster: patkelley Date: Oct 9, 2006 5:00pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The ones that aged well, and those that didn't

I think that the Other One was actually written to be a "timeless" sounding progression. It seems to have worked as far as I'm concerned.

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Poster: johnnyonthespot Date: Oct 10, 2006 1:55pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The ones that aged well, and those that didn't

Sorry but it sounds extremely dated to me. In fact one of their LEAST timeless tunes imo. Have to admit I'm not a very big O1 fan. I love cryptical but not really the O1. I do like the 73 spacey Other ones though.

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Poster: midnight sun Date: Oct 10, 2006 4:49pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The ones that aged well, and those that didn't

patkelley:

have to agree with you, The Other One provided some great jams and energy with it's modal form and driving triplet rhythms for nearly 28 years...there is a reason why it was the 3rd most played song

along with Playin' in the Band (most played song) far too many killer versions from all eras to list...before or after Drumz, out of Space or sandwiched, the simple little number cooked in a big way...doubt i would have attended even half of the shows i did without these 2 bullets in the regular rotation

good examples of early seeding by Miles Davis' Kind of Blue album (1958), pioneer of "modal jazz", at a time when jazz was exceedingly complicated, less chord changes but unlimited possibilities within those changes...and to think the members of the all star band Miles assembled for the session had no idea at the time that they were changing the approach to improvisation forever!

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Poster: patkelley Date: Oct 10, 2006 5:31pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The ones that aged well, and those that didn't

Good point about Miles. But I think that most Playin jams defy description or categorization into a specific musical technique- I dont know what those guys were doin in most of those Playins, and I'm a semi-skilled amateur musician!
ps- isnt Me & My Uncle the most played?

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Poster: Arbuthnot Date: Oct 9, 2006 3:55pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The ones that aged well, and those that didn't

ya got that right friend. TOO from 2/7/69 will flay you alive and leave you drained.

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Poster: yellowbear Date: Oct 9, 2006 10:06pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The ones that aged well, and those that didn't

Back to Row jimmy 12-28-79 is one of the best IMO, Jerry Blows a speaker.

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Poster: lobster12 Date: Oct 9, 2006 4:37pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The ones that aged well, and those that didn't

sadly, Saint of circumstace really deteriorated. By 94/95 the song was played at a snails pace and really lacked the power of the earlier versions.

Positively, I actually liked the wang dang Doodle post brent.

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Poster: high flow Date: Oct 9, 2006 5:06pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The ones that aged well, and those that didn't

I agree w/ NFA. When there was actually jamming happening, it was great. Later, it just followed Throwin' Stones, which wasn't that great either. I'd say the line on NFA can be drawn sometime in '87-'88, when the new pairing emerged. That's when it spoiled...

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Poster: patkelley Date: Oct 9, 2006 5:02pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The ones that aged well, and those that didn't

SOmetimes I think it's good that they ditched Lost Sailor as Saint's partner. Imagine Garcia trying that arrangement in 95. It could have been painful. (even though I probably like 95 more than most people on this site)

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Poster: johnnyonthespot Date: Oct 10, 2006 2:41pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The ones that aged well, and those that didn't

STELLA BLUE: I think it was much better in it's infancy. They could really pull off that delicate stuff back in those days.

ESTIMATED: I think the song was way better when it was first done. Later the rhythm got strange and forced to me and Bobby's cadance is flat to me.

LOSER: Definately think it got better with age. So did Deal

ROW JIMMY: I think they were nailing that tune greatly circa 90-91. Sometimes better than it's first years. I can't speak for after 91 because I rarely listen to those years.


NOT FADE AWAY: 71 is THE year for that song coupled with GDTRFB which happens to be one of my all time favorite Dead tunes. Second I would put 80-81 the way Brent has it growlin all funky and raunchy is great. Think it's too dragged out in 77 but what it turned into during the 80's sucked. I remember one hillarious folder on DNC that read something like " NFA what up all the dumb ass clapping at the end.." Laughed my arse off. Of course others got all sensitive but I never liked that part of the show. In fact the only thing I hated worse was I will take you home coming out of space.


JACK A ROE : I think it stood up fine in later years

Great post. Here's a few I've had on my mind:

Me and My uncle - why did they have to race through the beginning? Used to be cool how laid back it started. Then in what 73 0r 74 they changed it.

Jack Straw - same thing. Had that soft slow start then around the same time they change the beginning to a hurry up and get it done intro.

Crazy Fingers - many great versions BUT why couldn't they EVER get the intro right after 76? Sounds like unrehearsed sloppy sh*t. Just the intro mind you, they played the rest fine a lot of times.

This post was modified by johnnyonthespot on 2006-10-10 21:41:16

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Poster: midnight sun Date: Oct 10, 2006 12:23am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The ones that aged well, and those that didn't

Stella and Loser didn't come into there own until Jerry applied the heavy distortion to the solos...by 84 both of these were monsters compared to any of the renditions from the 70's

not normally a big fan of the general use of distortion effects, but Jer used them in a way that you could still distinguish every note while still getting all of the energy and sustain